Archive for the ‘Urban Renewal’ Category

Can shopping malls abandoned by time and left to rot by commercial failure or the march of time be revitalised as centres for urban farming and ecologically sustainable communities?  There seems to be plenty of evidence that this is indeed a possibility and numerous projects across North America are doing just that.  Douglas Rushkoff blogs about it here :

“The failure and abandonment of shopping malls throughout the country has a bright side: smart communities and businesses are turning them into greenhouses for organic agriculture. Talk about a nice urban hack. (Hack, as in its original sense of retooling something for a better purpose.)

If this is the way the post-apocalypse looks, count me in.”

The full story, Future Farmers of the Mall by Katie McCaskey, appears at Spectre.

Some interesting :

Dead Malls – a site which documents the malls which are either shut or in the process of being shut across the United States;

Gardens Under Glass – a feel good story about a slowly dying mall in Cleveland Ohio which is being rejuvenated with an urban farm initiative high in its ostentatious 1980s glass interior;

Core77 – has a story on The Los Angeles Forum’s Dead Malls Competition, which calls for the redesign of “at risk” American shopping malls. “With malls as such major parts of the North American landscape, the competition is very forward looking and optimistic about a more efficient use of space.”

Dual Context: Vidéoclubparis

Posted: July 22, 2010 in Urban Renewal
Video Club Paris

Viewers Lounging at Exhibit "En Maillot de Bain (In A Bathing Suit)"

An urban renewal project via a gallery reinvention from Paris :

“A new gallery for video art, Vidéoclubparis offers a single, hybrid space with two parallel modes of screening. The first is a monthly, online exhibition of a dozen young artists, centered around a variety of themes (from ‘soundtrack’ to ‘bathing suit’, among many others); presented with basic information about the pieces and their creators. The second part is a live screening-event organized for each opening, in unlikely, semi-private places ranging from a sauna to a Bollywood video store. By seeking out unique locations for screenings, the event challenges the idea of the formal white cube – an aspect that is emphasized by the parallel screenings on the web. “The aim is to create bipolar screenings, we’re trying to do the high jump between watching videos online and taking people to a place completely unexpected,” said Stéphanie Cottin, co-founder of the organization, “the two work well together, because the extravagance of the events balances out the conventionalism of the online curation.”

For more info visit our friends at Rhizome

Community Splash

Posted: May 22, 2010 in Urban Renewal

Urban Renewal project in Pittsburgh USA :  At 2pm on May 6th, 2005 in Pittsburgh, PA, a paint-filled balloon is launched at an 18-story apartment building at over 80mph. The explosion of color is met with cheers and laughter from over one hundred local community members as this symbolic and cathartic event marks the beginning of a much anticipated urban renewal project. These balloons were lauched by a 25 foot tall slingshot constructed by Johnny Lee and Joshua Atlas as a public art installation to give community members an opportunity to take part in transforming the high-rise into one of the largest art monuments in the country before its scheduled demolition.

For more info : http://johnnylee.net/slingshot/

A Glimpse of Newcastle

Posted: May 10, 2010 in Urban Renewal

Mark Kennedy: Just got back from Newcastle (oh yeah, and Sydney) and very excited about having seen first hand what Renew has achieved down there. And even more excited to see what this could do for Townsville.

Sydney Research

Posted: May 10, 2010 in Urban Renewal

Mark Kennedy: I’m off to visit Newcastle on Thursday (sneaky side trip from the Architecture Conference in Sydney). Can’t wait to see all of their Renew projects first hand and meet some more of the people involved. Will report back here soon.